History

Friends of the Wisconsin Wolf and Wildlife is a grassroots organization which was started in 2011, and officially became recognized as a 501(c) (3) in 2012. We formed in response to the wolf hunt and expansion of hunting and trapping in state parks in Wisconsin and have been active in participating in wolf and wildlife reform, inspiring mainstream hunters, non-extractive users, scientists, tribal members and the general public to become involved with wildlife through advocacy and education.

Scientific Advisory Board

Adrian Treves PhD

Picture of Adrian TrevesAdrian earned his B.A. in 1990 in Biology and Anthropology from Rice University and his PhD in 1997 in Behavioral Ecology and Biological Anthropology from Harvard University. In 2007, he founded the Carnivore Coexistence Lab at the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Adrian’s research focuses on how to balance human needs with wildlife conservation. To study this question, he explores people’s conflicts with large carnivores, particularly livestock predation in the USA and abroad. This line of inquiry includes livestock husbandry, wildlife management, human and carnivore behavior, and methods for mitigating human-carnivore conflicts. Adrian and his students conduct fieldwork in Wisconsin (wolves and other large carnivores) with a variety of collaborators. Click here for links to his recent research articles on carnivores, compensation, hunting, mitigating human-wildlife conflicts, and co-management.

Jack Stewart PhD

Picture of Jack StewartJohn M. Stewart, Emeritus Professor of Psychobiology and Director, Northland College Wolf Research Team. Formerly at Georgetown University, Johns Hopkins University, the National Institutes of Health, and The Jackson Laboratory, Jack is a semi-retired biobehavioral scientist with over fifty years of experience studying canid species, particularly domesticated dogs and wolves in the wild.

Heather Stricker Orlovsky M.S.

Picture of Heather StickerHeather is currently the Wildlife Resources Program Director for the Forest County Potawatomi Community near Crandon, Wisconsin. Through this position, Heather has designed and implemented an intensive biodiversity assessment on tribal lands, including geospatial hotspot analysis; assisted the State with writing the new Beaver Management Plan; spent time on the original Wolf Roundtable; and is currently initiating bat research through a joint endeavor with the US Forest Service. Heather received a Master’s Degree in Conservation Biology from Central Michigan University where her research focused on wolf recolonization of the northern Lower Peninsula and GIS modeling of den habitat and travel corridors throughout the Upper and Lower Peninsulas. Heather received her Bachelor’s Degree in Animal Ecology from Iowa State University and has spent much of her career working with predators, including work on a bobcat project in Iowa, the lynx reintroduction project in Colorado, and the ongoing predator-prey research still underway in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Heather is also the Chair-Elect for the Native Peoples Wildlife Management Working Group of The Wildlife Society.

Strategic Plan

The FOTWW’s Strategic Plan sets our priorities and focuses our work on the most meaningful goals we can accomplish to advocate for wolves and wildlife in Wisconsin and beyond. While our strategic plan is currently under development for 2016-2018, we are focusing and measuring our success by the following:

  1. Organizational Stability – Expand mentoring and resources for volunteers, to increase recruitment, commitment and retention. Creating Scientific Advisory Board
  2. Internal Communications/Transparency – Foster and safeguard a culture of open communications and transparency in all facets of FOTWW.
  3. Partnerships – Maintain existing and establish new partnerships that support the mission of the FOTWW
  4. Outreach/Education – FOTWW actively engages diverse audiences through broadened outreach opportunities. Create a task group of diverse individuals to develop targeted outreach.
  5. Financial Sustainability – Build an endowment to meet current obligations, along with projected needs and opportunities.
  6. Advocacy – The FOTWW board and volunteers are actively engaged at all levels of government and community forums in advocating for wolves and wildlife in Wisconsin.
  7. Media – Keep FOTWW in the news through various tactics, including letters to the editor, protests, campaigns, radio/tv, press releases, ETC.

Bylaws

Click here to view our bylaws.

Financials

Available upon request. We firmly believe in the Donor’s Bill of Rights.